oupacademic:

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography podcast: Lionel Logue, speech therapist to George VI

In 1924 Logue and his family visited England for what was intended as a holiday. However, while staying in London he saw the possibilities of establishing a speech therapy practice in the capital and rented rooms at 146 Harley Street. Logue had no medical qualifications and, initially, little capital but he built up his practice steadily. The fees paid him by wealthier clients enabled him to treat poorer patients without charge. Logue’s association with his most famous client began in October 1925; he was present when the duke of York (later George VI) gave his closing speech as president of the British Empire Exhibition in which he stammered badly throughout. Logue is reported to have said to his son that he was sure that he could ‘very nearly … manage a complete cure’.

The story of Lionel Logue is one of over 200 episodes available from the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography’s podcast archive. New episodes are released every second Wednesday.

Image: Lionel Logue crop, Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Cicchetti
The first thing you have to know to understand this story is that there are two Giardini stops; one for the Biennale and one for the “main drag” of the Giardini, which leads to Via Garibaldi. If I hadn’t mistaken one for the other, I likely would not have run into my contact Claudia in the same way, and likely would have spent another half hour searching high and low for her through the mobs of tourists that plague the seafront. You really have to see it to believe it; the navi spilling tourists out thousands at a time onto this timeless city, so they can gawk and walk and not buy anything, but return to their boats for dinnertime.
As luck had it, I found Claudia and began speaking with her immediately about Venice and the plights of the people.
“Tourists aren’t the biggest problem,” she related. I’ll admit, I was surprised to be incorrect about this. The biggest problem is the size of Venice, the tiny, impossible size of this city stuck in a “fake reality”, as Claudia puts it, stuck in a time before cars and wifi (which is hard to get), stuck in the Doge’s Venetian Empire, as it were, sea-bound and magnificent. We discussed the time when the city was flooded with more than 200,000 residents, not tourists, who must have made this a happenin’ place. Now, at less than 60,000 residents, the buzz is not the same.
Where are the Venetians?
Mestre, Claudia says. Inland. The young Venetians leave because there are no good jobs here, they cannot afford a house here, they cannot enjoy the normal comforts of Italian living.
“You have to escape,” she sadly points out. “For the first time, for one or two years, you are very happy in Venice.” Then, you want out. 
So why are there still Venetians here, I asked. Stubbornness, not wanting to change, was what I imagined the answer to be. Laziness was Claudia’s response. 
So where are these real Venetians? 
Claudia insists, as I have found out, that there are hide-away places that they haunt, like sailor ghosts in the cabin, drinking and eating their small, tapas-like cicchetti to their hearts’ content. I found one myself and was disappointed in the wraith-like people I saw drifting in and out with their caffe or vino and not lingering, not really talking to each other.
Surely this was not Venice. Is there a password?
Turns out, the password is “Paolo”.
My acquaintance Paolo Olbi, whom I am interviewing for “Venetian Artisanship and Climate Change” for the Pulitzer Center, led me into a dimly lit and low-ceilinged place full of locals chatting happily on their lunch break, which can range from two to three hours each day. Most of these Venetians were his age- 70 or more- but happy, not ghostly at all. This was a bar full of cicchetti and life. Maybe it was the only one left- I doubt it, but it is hard to tell. Having been here only a handful of days, and being here for only one month more, perhaps I won’t experience this Venetian living much more. But, somewhere in this dying city-on-stilts, there are Venetians, and they need their city back.
For further information on cicchetti, check this out.

Image and text by Eric Shoemaker. Venice, 2014. 
Shoemaker is a Pulitzer Center student fellow University of Chicago, documenting how artisans and artists in Venice will be affected by the rising tides in the city.
  • Camera: Nikon D3200
  • Aperture: f/3.5
  • Exposure: 1/160th
  • Focal Length: 18mm

pulitzerfieldnotes:

Cicchetti

The first thing you have to know to understand this story is that there are two Giardini stops; one for the Biennale and one for the “main drag” of the Giardini, which leads to Via Garibaldi. If I hadn’t mistaken one for the other, I likely would not have run into my contact Claudia in the same way, and likely would have spent another half hour searching high and low for her through the mobs of tourists that plague the seafront. You really have to see it to believe it; the navi spilling tourists out thousands at a time onto this timeless city, so they can gawk and walk and not buy anything, but return to their boats for dinnertime.

As luck had it, I found Claudia and began speaking with her immediately about Venice and the plights of the people.

“Tourists aren’t the biggest problem,” she related. I’ll admit, I was surprised to be incorrect about this. The biggest problem is the size of Venice, the tiny, impossible size of this city stuck in a “fake reality”, as Claudia puts it, stuck in a time before cars and wifi (which is hard to get), stuck in the Doge’s Venetian Empire, as it were, sea-bound and magnificent. We discussed the time when the city was flooded with more than 200,000 residents, not tourists, who must have made this a happenin’ place. Now, at less than 60,000 residents, the buzz is not the same.

Where are the Venetians?

Mestre, Claudia says. Inland. The young Venetians leave because there are no good jobs here, they cannot afford a house here, they cannot enjoy the normal comforts of Italian living.

“You have to escape,” she sadly points out. “For the first time, for one or two years, you are very happy in Venice.” Then, you want out. 

So why are there still Venetians here, I asked. Stubbornness, not wanting to change, was what I imagined the answer to be. Laziness was Claudia’s response. 

So where are these real Venetians? 

Claudia insists, as I have found out, that there are hide-away places that they haunt, like sailor ghosts in the cabin, drinking and eating their small, tapas-like cicchetti to their hearts’ content. I found one myself and was disappointed in the wraith-like people I saw drifting in and out with their caffe or vino and not lingering, not really talking to each other.

Surely this was not Venice. Is there a password?

Turns out, the password is “Paolo”.

My acquaintance Paolo Olbi, whom I am interviewing for “Venetian Artisanship and Climate Change” for the Pulitzer Center, led me into a dimly lit and low-ceilinged place full of locals chatting happily on their lunch break, which can range from two to three hours each day. Most of these Venetians were his age- 70 or more- but happy, not ghostly at all. This was a bar full of cicchetti and life. Maybe it was the only one left- I doubt it, but it is hard to tell. Having been here only a handful of days, and being here for only one month more, perhaps I won’t experience this Venetian living much more. But, somewhere in this dying city-on-stilts, there are Venetians, and they need their city back.

For further information on cicchetti, check this out.

Image and text by Eric Shoemaker. Venice, 2014. 

Shoemaker is a Pulitzer Center student fellow University of Chicago, documenting how artisans and artists in Venice will be affected by the rising tides in the city.

nicolasbruno:

It has been said that there are passageways and tunnels at the bottoms of wells such as this one… Piazza Giordano Bruno; Perugia, Italy.
  • Camera: iPhone 4S
  • Aperture: f/2.4
  • Exposure: 1/120th
  • Focal Length: 4mm

nicolasbruno:

It has been said that there are passageways and tunnels at the bottoms of wells such as this one…
Piazza Giordano Bruno; Perugia, Italy.

(via langlyco)

jakfruit:
I had really boring decorations on my living room shelf, so I finally did something about it.
These are just corked bottles from a craft store that I’ve filled with dried petals and a feather each, then sealed with white candle wax. A very cheap, quick and simple little DIY project.
  • Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  • Aperture: f/10
  • Exposure: 1/80th
  • Focal Length: 40mm

jakfruit:

I had really boring decorations on my living room shelf, so I finally did something about it.

These are just corked bottles from a craft store that I’ve filled with dried petals and a feather each, then sealed with white candle wax. A very cheap, quick and simple little DIY project.

(via chuyencuabeo)

cctvnews:

China’s Henan Province faces worst drought in 63 years

A severe drought has hit central #China’s Henan Province, caused by a sharp decline in #rainfall – the lowest since 1951 – and scorching temperatures.

Nearly 742,000 people in the province are facing water shortages.

The drought has put additional pressure on agriculture in the region, with some farmers giving up on cultivating crops since they do not have enough water to irrigate their fields.

The situation is especially severe in Baofeng County, with nearly 80% of the crops under threat.

Most residents are struggling to maintain their daily water supply. Most of them rely on wells that have almost dried out. They are, thus, depending on trucks that carry water from the nearby river.

With the #drought being an annual concern and worsening with each year, many young people are choosing to migrate to larger cities to earn a living.

They hope that with their earnings, they can support their families back home in case of crop failures.